Again with the Spinning (and a winner – or winners actually)

(And again with the technical difficulties, too – sorry for my delay in posting about the giveaway winner! I tried to post yesterday but failed).

We are deep into Tour de Fleece now, and I have been spending all my crafting time making yarn. My pile of knitting keeps staring at me sulkily, but I’m committed to doing as much spinning as possible during this three-week tour. I’ll be picking up th knitting needles again soon.

The Hello Yarn “Gobbler” on Cheviot was a delicious spin. I finished the final skein on Saturday:

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Which meant that, in one weeks’ time, I had completed an entire sweater spin:

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This was a feat I’d never have been able to accomplish without my new miniSpinner. So, thank you, miniSpinner!

There’s obvious variance from skein-to-skein with this spin, but I plan to alternate the skeins while knitting, so I think it will all even out. I have one more 4oz. bump of the fiber to spin up, in case this isn’t enough for the sweater I have in mind, but I think it will be. I can’t wait to cast on for this!!

But instead of casting on, I put more fiber on the spinner, and away I went:

action shot

action shot

This was the dreamiest of dreamy spins:

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This is Hello Yarn “Light as Feathers” on Romney Lambswool and it is AH-MA-ZING.

In almost no time, I had this:

20150717-113539.jpg

I have very special plans for this skein, but once I finished it I began dreaming of an entire sweater of this lusciousness. I’m very, very tempted to try to get my hands on more of it.

But for now, I put more Hello Yarn on the wheel, this time part of the MegaSAL I’ve been a part of this spring and summer:

20150717-113559.jpg

This is “Crivens!” on BFL/Silk – aren’t those colors just divine? I’ve finished chain-plying the first half and am now spinning up the second half, for a pair of yummy socks.

Okay, okay, I know you’re not really here to see the spinning – you want to know who won the giveaway, right? First, let me say, thank you, THANK YOU, for spreading the word about this. The best way I know to express my joy and gratitude for our son’s safe rescue is to do my best to prevent this kind of accident from happening to anyone else’s child. Thank you for helping me do that!

Secondly, I decided to pick two winners. There were lots of people who shared and posted on Facebook who didn’t comment on the blog post, and I wanted to include them all in the drawing, but I didn’t want to be unfair to those who had also taken the time to comment on the post. So I did one drawing just for the people who commented on the post, and that person will receive the original skein I posted:

Southern Cross Fibre "Nobby" South African Superfine

Southern Cross Fibre “Nobby” South African Superfine

The winner of that skein (or of something made from that skein if she isn’t a knitter) is Molly Gee – Molly, thank you for spreading the word. I’ll be in touch to get your mailing address and ship this off to you (or something made from it)!

I did a second drawing that included everyone who had commented on the original blog post and also those who only commented on Facebook, and that person will receive another handspun skein (something I’ll pick from my stash) or something made from it. The winner of that gift is Jessica Pressley – Jessica, thank you for spreading the word. I’ll be in touch to get your mailing address!

Thanks, y’all, for your very kind words, your ongoing help in raising awareness of this kind of accident and how to prevent it, and for your continued willingness to share in my joy!

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Knit Two Together: What I Do When I’m Not Knitting (and also, a Book Giveaway)

I learned to knit from the internet. Actually, first I learned to knit from a book. Then I learned to knit well from the internet. The still photos on flat pages hadn’t really shown me how to move my fingers and my hands, and my book-learning led to a very cumbersome, non-fluid, not-very-fun knitting method. Then, in the fall of September 2005, when my twins were 15 months old, I turned to the internet to learn a better way (because toddlerhood is a great time for a mom to pick up a new hobby, yes? no, actually, it was insane that at the very moment my kids were at their busiest, I constantly had my hands full of yarn and needles). I found KnittingHelp, and just sat in front of the computer while my kids slept, watching the videos and imitating the actions, until I finally got it. And then I got obsessed.

From those videos, it was a short hop to the online forums at KnittingHelp, which is where I made my first knitting friends, and where I first discovered knitting blogs. And before long, in January 2006, I started my own knitting blog. In the days before Ravelry, the knitting blogosphere was, for me, a vital way to learn new techniques, to discover new-to-me yarns and patterns, to share encouragement and inspiration, and to connect with other people who were as obsessed with this ancient craft as I was. Many of the blogs I read back then no longer exist, yet the friendships I made through them remain. Through the wonders of technology, I was able to learn a traditional craft. Through that same technology, I was able to create new friendships and connections with people I otherwise would never have met.

At the same time, and through this same technology, I have found deep and life-sustaining connection with a whole other community. As you may or may not know, in my “real life,” I’m a church pastor. This isn’t something I write about on this blog (and I don’t intend for that to change), but just as I found the online knitting community to be an essential (and fun!) part of growing in my craft, I also discovered a supportive online community for clergywomen to be an essential (and fun!) part of growing in my vocation. That community is RevGalBlogPals, which started as a few dozen women bloggers in 2005 and now numbers in the thousands (and includes not just clergywomen but also supportive clergymen and laywomen). Working in a male-dominated field, in a field that is so easily misunderstood by those outside of it, and doing this work while trying to balance its demands with the demands of mothering, it’s been an incredible gift to have a group of women (and supportive men!) who “get it.” A number of the RevGals are also knitters, and they “get” that part of me, too.

For the past decade, as my identity as a knitter has unfolded, I have reflected a lot on what it means to have an avocation that is so important to me, especially when I also have a vocation that is so important to me. Do these two parts of me – knitter and minister – have anything to do with each other? How do these two parts of who I am nourish and nurture each other? And what about my two communities – the craft community and the church-related community – what are there commonalities, and what do I learn from one community that has application in the other? In other words, I spend a lot of time mentally trying to “knit two together.” If you’re a knitter, you’ll know that knitting two together is a way of decreasing your knitting. In my real life, though, I find that knitting two together brings a marvelous increase – of energy, of creativity, of insight, of compassion.

I recently reflected on this in a little piece I wrote for a book that just came out. The piece is entitled, “I Rise Before the Sun,” and the book is called There’s a Woman in the Pulpit: Christian Clergywomen Share Their Hard Days, Holy Moments & the Healing Power of Humor. This book was a collaboration, written by 52 clergywomen representing 15 different denominations, and edited by the Reverend Martha Spong, Director of RevGalBlogPals. And it’s so good, y’all! Every piece is a really nice, tight piece of writing, and Martha did an outstanding job editing it. I’m not surprised she did such a great job pulling it together – she, too, is a knitter, after all. The book is an amazing collaboration of different voices and varying perspectives from all over the English-speaking world. You could call it a mosaic, or you could call it a tapestry, or you could call it gorgeous knitting, made from hand-painted, handspun yarn – every stitch is different, each one shimmering with its own personality and beauty.
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I wanted to tell you about this not because I’m going to shift the focus of this blog from the knitting part of my life to the churchy part of my life – don’t worry! actual knitting content is coming very soon! – but because I thought some of you might be interested to know about it and about my wee part in it. Also, I would love to send a copy of this book to one of you. Actually, I’ve love to send a copy to all of you! But I can’t really afford to do that, unless “all” of you turns out to only be one person (which is entirely possible, given my sad lack of blogging lately). If you would be interested in receiving a copy of this book, please let me know in the comment section! I’ll use a Random Number Generator to select the recipient on Friday, May 8th. I’ll only be entering people who comment on this entry (so if you comment on Facebook, please make sure to comment on the blog too, okay?). And it’s open to everyone of course – knitters, non-knitters, clergy, non-clergy, people of any faith or no faith, friends, acquaintances, strangers, all.

Thank you, dear reader, whether you are knitter, clergy, both, or neither, for being part of an online community that continues to challenge and cheer me. Mwah!

How the week went (and a winner)

I had so many things big plans last week – things to finish knitting, things to start knitting, things to share with you – and then the week started off this way:

Portico, in progress

Portico, in progress

That, my friends, is me running out of yarn with about 6 inches of bind-off left on a shawl I had finally almost finished after letting hibernate for two years.

This was the Through the Loops Mystery Shawl of 2012, and I set it aside in July of that year when I got involved knitting other things (which were almost all Through the Loops designs, so I was monogamous, in a way). I wanted to knit this year’s Mystery Shawl, but decided to make myself finish that one first. It was going great!

love that blue

love that blue

This is such a great knit, and such a dreamy yarn (Jade Sapphire Silk/Cashmere 2-ply). LOVE it. When I picked the shawl up, I was, of course, surprised to see that there wasn’t really that much left to do. But as I knit, I realized one of the reasons I set it aside in the first place – I was almost certainly not going to have enough yarn. No idea why I ordered one skein of 400 yard yarn, when the pattern calls for 450 yards. And I can’t find more of this color (Curacao) anyway – I think I got it on closeout. At any rate, I stopped the final part of the pattern a few rows ahead of where it was supposed to end, even tinking back an entire row of lace to make sure I had enough yarn to finish up.

Last Sunday night, during Game of Thrones, I did the bind-off, until there was no more yarn.

20140616-141656.jpg

 

Right now, the idea of undoing the bind-off and ripping back a bit is more than I can stomach. I’m going to weave in what few ends there are (I think there are three) and see if I can splice together enough yarn from what’s left after that to complete the bind-off. Otherwise, I have no idea what I’ll do.

It was disappointing enough that I actually went two whole days before doing any more knitting, which is kind of unheard of for me. Well, it wasn’t only disappointment and discouragement, my week also became blindingly busy and there was just no time or energy for any knitting (and certainly not for any spinning).

The remedy, of course is a new project:

Through the Loops Mystery Shawl Knitalong 2014

Through the Loops Mystery Shawl Knitalong 2014

More about that later.

Ah! But the giveaway! Thank you all SO MUCH for your wonderful comments on my last post, and thank you for taking the time to pass on this important information to people. Between the comments on the post and the people who shared and let me know on Facebook, there were 67 entries into the giveaway (I made sure not to double count people who commented both on my blog and on Facebook). I plugged the number into the Random Number Generator and got:

Screenshot 2014-06-16 14.23.59

#17 – Susan Michaud, who wrote: “I pinned it to my Kids board on Pinterest. As a grandmother of 8, this is good to know!” Thanks, Susan! I’ll be in touch!

Thank you again, to all of you, for your kind comments – and for your warm wishes for my kiddos for their birthday!

 

4 things every parent should know about sand safety (plus a giveaway)

 My boys turned 10 last weekend, which is amazing and wonderful and unbelievable all at once.

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As many of you know, we nearly lost one of our sons in a beach accident almost seven years ago, when the boys were three. I tell the story every year in hopes of helping people learn about the dangerous but preventable phenomenon of sand hole collapse. In the past, I’ve shared about this on the anniversary of our son’s rescue, but I’ve realized I really need to get the word out earlier in beach season, in order to help raise awareness for as many people as possible.

In July 2007, when my sons were three years-old and our family was visiting Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, one of them fell into a hole dug by other children, and the sand collapsed on top of him, burying him completely, with his head at least 8 inches under the surface. He was completely buried for at least five minutes; miraculously, he survived. You can read the full story here, with follow-up here . And read about it from the amazing perspective of Erika Weiland, the woman who saved his life, here.

After our accident, I learned that this kind of accident, while uncommon, is not unheard of; it is not a “freak accident.” In fact, this sort of accident happens on beaches around the world every year, more frequently than shark attacks do. The vast majority of these kinds of accidents happen to boys, between the ages of three and 21. Even when the accident is witnessed and people act quickly, it can be very difficult to dig a child out of a hole or trench on the beach; the sand wants to keep filling back in the hole. The majority of these accidents end in death.

While this kind of accident is uncommon, it’s still a risk, and one that can be prevented without too much effort. There are four easy things you can do to prevent such a tragedy.

20140605-232205.jpg

(please pin this! I don’t have the Pin It widget, which isn’t supported on wordpress.com, but I would love for you to share this list on Pinterest)

So, that’s it: one thing to do when you arrive at the beach, one thing to do while you’re there, and one thing to do when you leave, plus one thing to teach your kids. I know that #2 seems pretty severe. I got this piece of advice from Dr. Bradley Maron, who has studied sand hole collapses, but if knee-high holes are just too shallow for your group to deal with, perhaps waist-high of the shortest person in your group?

Every year, as part of my celebration of getting our baby back, I post about our experience, in hopes of raising awareness of this entirely preventable sort of accident. Every summer these accidents continue to happen. I believe that with more awareness of the risks, such tragedy could be avoided. My internet friends have been a huge part of helping me raise awareness. Will you help me spread the word again this year?

I always like to give a little something away as part of my celebration of this amazing anniversary. This year, I would like to give away something that reminds me of the gorgeous water at Santa Rosa Beach (part of what is known as The Emerald Coast).

FLUFF Merino-Cashmere-Nylon, "Murky," 4 oz.

FLUFF Merino-Cashmere-Nylon, “Murky,” 4 oz.

I love this fiber SO much. It’s so super-gorgeous and I would love to share it with you. If the winner is a spinner, I will send you the fiber for you to spin. If the winner is a knitter but not a spinner, I will spin it for you to knit. And it the winner is neither a spinner nor a knitter, I will spin it up and knit something yummy for you.

the flip-side

the flip-side

All you have to do to enter the giveaway is spread the word about the risk of sandhole collapse and what to do to prevent these kinds of accidents. Spread the word however you’d like – on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+, your own blog, word-of-mouth, or all of the above. If you spread the word online, you can link back to this page, or to one of the previous posts I linked to above. Then come back here and leave a comment, letting me know you’ve passed it on, and I’ll enter you into the drawing. I will draw a random winner next Friday, June 14, after 5:00pm EST.

Some of you, of your own volition, have already linked to this story this season. THANK YOU! If you would like to be entered in the giveaway, just leave a comment letting me know you’ve already posted/linked, and I will enter you.

Thank you, good people of the internet, for continuing to help me spread the word about this.
our family :: five years ago
July 9, 2007 – the night after the accident

 

six years, four tips, one giveaway :: celebration of a rescue

Six years ago today, we almost lost our then-3 year-old son in a sand hole collapse at Santa Rosa Beach, in Florida. He fell into a hole dug by other children, and the sand collapsed on top of him, burying him completely, with his head at least 8 inches under the surface. Miraculously, he survived. You can read the full story here , with follow-up here . And read about it from the amazing perspective of Erika Wieland, the woman who saved his life, here .

Untitled
Our little lion and his twin brother are now 9 years old. They both remember the accident, and speak about it freely. None of us takes for granted the gift we were given that day at the beach.

After our accident, I learned that sandhole collapses are a more frequent occurrence than I would’ve dreamed, and that the majority of them end in death. There are four easy things you can do to prevent such a tragedy:
1. When you arrive at the beach, always check nearby for any holes left by others, and fill them in.
2. Do not dig holes any deeper than knee-high of the shortest person in your group. Yeah, I know this sounds extreme. If this feels more extreme than your group can accommodate then perhaps you can at least stop at waist-high.
3. If you do dig holes, fill them in before you leave. The hole my son fell in had been left by other children.
4. Make sure any children you go to the beach with know that holes and trenches can be dangerous, and that they should let you know if they see any abandoned holes.

Every year, as part of my celebration of getting our baby back, I post about our experience, in hopes of raising awareness of this entirely preventable sort of accident. Every summer these accidents continue to happen. I believe that with more awareness of the risks, such tragedy could be avoided.

My internet friends have been a huge part of helping me raise awareness. Will you help me spread the word again this year?

I always like to give a little something away as part of my celebration of this amazing anniversary. I don’t yet know what it will be this year – possibly yarn, possibly handspun, or possibly something handknit. I will surprise you! It will be something I pick out and send you later this summer (after my travels are done).

All you have to do to enter the giveaway is spread the word about the risk of sandhole collapse and what to do to prevent these kinds of accidents. Spread the word however you’d like – on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, your own blog, word-of-mouth, or all of the above). If you spread the word online, you can link back to this page (or to one of the previous posts I linked to above). Then come back here (or on my link to this post on Facebook) and leave a comment, letting me know you’ve passed it on, and I’ll enter you into the drawing. I will draw a random winner next Monday, July 15, after 5:00pm EST.

Thanks, good people of the internet, for celebrating with me, and for helping me spread the word about this.
our family :: five years ago
July 9, 2007 – the night after the accident

Thank you, thank you, THANK YOU for spreading the word about this! I am closing the comments and will do a drawing for the giveaway SOON!!!

five years later :: celebration of a rescue

then and now :: Little Buddha and me

then and now :: Little Buddha and me, originally uploaded by earthchick.

As many of you know, five years ago yesterday, we almost lost our then-3 year-old son in a sand hole collapse at Santa Rosa Beach, in Florida. He fell into a hole dug by other children, and the sand collapsed on top of him, burying him completely, with his head at least 8 inches under the surface. Miraculously, he survived. You can read the full story here , with follow-up here . And read about it from the amazing perspective of Erika Wieland, the woman who saved his life, here .

Little Buddha :: five years later

Our little guy and his twin brother are now 8 years old. They both remember the accident, and speak about it freely. None of us takes for granted the gift we were given that day at the beach.

Tiny Dancer, Little Buddha :: five years later

After our accident, I learned that sandhole collapses are a more frequent occurrence than I would’ve dreamed, and that the majority of them end in death. There are four easy things you can do to prevent such a tragedy:
1. When you arrive at the beach, always check nearby for any holes left by others, and fill them in.
2. Do not dig holes any deeper than knee-high of the shortest person in your group. Yeah, I know this sounds extreme. If this feels more extreme than your group can accommodate then perhaps you can at least stop at waist-high.
3. If you do dig holes, fill them in before you leave. The hole my son fell in had been left by other children.
4. Make sure any children you go to the beach with know that holes and trenches can be dangerous, and that they should let you know if they see any abandoned holes.

Every year, as part of my celebration of getting our baby back, I post about our experience, in hopes of raising awareness of this entirely preventable sort of accident. Every summer these accidents continue to happen (a teenager in California was nearly killed two weeks ago). My internet friends have been a huge part of helping me get out the word.

Also as part of my celebration, I always do a tiny giveaway. This year, I’d like to give one of you this handknite shawlette:
knitted :: Nefertem
This is a Through the Loops pattern, Nefertem. I loved every minute of knitting it and would love wearing it, too, but I decided that instead I would like to give it away as a way of sharing my joy. (I’ll be posting more pics and deets about the shawl tomorrow – just wanted y’all to get a glimpse of the giveaway goods).

All you have to do is leave a comment here, or on my Facebook page, and I will enter you into the drawing. And if you let me know that you spread the word (through FB, TW, Google+, or your own blog), I will enter you a second time. I will draw a random winner next Monday, July 16, after 5:00pm EST.

our family :: five years ago
(five years ago)

our family :: five years later
(five years later)

Thanks for celebrating with me y’all.

summer! vacation! jumpity! and a winner!



365.58 outtake, originally uploaded by earthchick.

(This is an old shot from summer vacation in Georgia three years ago. It seemed appropriate to how I feel about summer and about the fact that I am six days away from vacation!). But I know what you’re really here for: who won my little giveaway?

First I just want to say thank you SO much for your wonderful, kind comments, and for passing on the information about sand hole dangers. I love how social media makes such information-sharing so easy, and I appreciate your willingness to pass it on. Thank you!!

Between blog comments, flickr comments, Facebook comments, and the sharing that so many of you did on your own blogs, Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, I counted up 306 entries to the little giveaway. The Random Number Generator selected #235, which was a flickr comment from Aimee . Which is actually pretty cool because she is also a curly-haired mom of twin boys, and a knitter, and a yoga practitioner. We live on opposite sides of the country, but we have a lot in common! I first “met” Aimee online right before she gave birth to her beautiful boys (which was shortly before my own sons turned three). Congrats, Aimee. I’ll be in touch!

Thanks again, y’all. And hooray for summer, hooray for family, hooray for safety, and hooray for all of you, friends.

anniversary of a rescue :: celebrate with me!

I celebrate this anniversary every year, and I assume I always will. Four years ago today, our son was almost killed. The fact that he wasn’t seems like something to keep celebrating.

Four years ago today, while vacationing at Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, our then 3 year-old son fell into a hole dug by other children. The hole collapsed on him, burying him. He was completely buried (with his head at least 8 inches under the surface) for 5 minutes or more. Miraculously, he survived. (The full story is here , with follow-up here ).

Little Buddha, age 7

Afterwards, I learned that sandhole collapses are a more frequent occurrence than I would’ve dreamed, and that the majority of them end in death. There are four easy things you can do to prevent such a tragedy:
1. When you arrive at the beach, always check nearby for any holes left by others, and fill them in.
2. Do not dig holes any deeper than knee-high of the shortest person in your group. Yeah, I know this sounds extreme. If this feels more extreme than your group can accommodate then perhaps you can at least stop at waist-high.
3. If you do dig holes, fill them in before you leave. The hole my son fell in had been left by other children.
4. Make sure any children you go to the beach with know that holes and trenches can be dangerous, and that they should let you know if they see any abandoned holes.

Every year, as part of my celebration of getting our baby back, I post about our experience, in hopes of raising awareness of this entirely preventable sort of accident. Every summer these accidents continue to happen (a teenager in California was nearly killed two weeks ago). My internet friends have been a huge part of helping me get out the word.

Also as part of my celebration, I always do a tiny giveaway. This year, I’m giving away this .
fiber :: Hello Yarn Rambouillet

That’s Hello Yarn Rambouillet in “Burrows” (October 2010 Fiber Club).

Here’s the deal, if a spinner wins it, it’s yours to spin! If a non-spinning knitter wins it, I will spin it up for you! (to get to you in September or so). And if a non-spinning non-knitting person wins it, I will spin it up and knit you a fall hat or mittens with it. Pretty good deal, eh?

All you have to do is leave a comment here, or on my blog, or on my Facebook or Google Plus page, and I will enter you into the drawing. And if you let me know that you spread the word (through FB, TW, Google+, or your own blog), I will enter you a second time. I will draw a random winner next Saturday, July 16, after 5:00pm EST.

Thanks for celebrating with me y’all.

love this kid

5 years, 400 posts, and a giveaway



for my 5th blogiversary, originally uploaded by earthchick.

Well guess what, y’all? This blog is 5 years old now, and this here is my 400th post. And as a thank you, I have a little giveaway going on.

Blogging has changed a lot, or seems to have, since the advent of flickr, and Facebook, and Twitter, and, of course, for those of us in the craftblog world, Ravelry. And, for many of us, blogging and reading blogs has become a smaller and smaller part of our internet experience. My own consistency with blogging has waxed and waned over the years, and from time to time I have certainly considered dropping the blog altogether.

But I like having my little spot on the web, and as long as I don’t weigh myself down with expectations about how consistent I will be or how great each post will be, I still find it fun. And this blog was a starting point for me in making connections with the online craft community. I still find that community and those connections hugely important. Sometimes I spend more time with that community on Twitter, or on Ravelry, or on flickr, or on Facebook, or here on my blog. I like that it is fluid. The internet is like a big ol’ party, and I can float from room to room and enjoy it as it comes.

I love it. And I love the people I’ve met here. And I’m grateful to those of you who continue to read, and to comment. You rock.

Just for funsies, I scrolled back through my first blog posts and found this, my very first FO picture. It wasn’t my first finished object, but it was the first one I ever thought to take a picture of, and it was my first hat. And I think my first knitting in the round.

my first FO pic, fall 2005
That’s a 16 month-old Tiny Dancer right there (and a crappy point-and-shoot camera).

And also for funsies, here’s a picture of Little Buddha around the same time, but without knitwear.
Little Buddha, toddler

They’ve grown a lot in the past 5 years. I feel like I have too, especially as a knitter. You guys have been a big part of that. Huge. In fact, I don’t know if I would even be knitting without the knowledge and encouragement and inspiration I’ve gained from the internet. So, thank you.

And to say thank you with more than words, I have a fun little giveaway. Serendipitously, a representative from CSN Stores contacted me recently and offered me the opportunity to host a giveaway from them. I jumped at the chance. They are offering a $55 promotional code for one lucky person to use on any of their websites. Pretty cool, huh? You might know them from their website Modern Rugs . Pretty stuff there! They also have a site for Modern Furniture , Shoes , Pet Stuff , and many other shops. The gift code can be used at any of their sites.

Interested? Leave a comment – let me know your thoughts about the state of blogging, the role of blogs, or anything else you want to say – by Wednesday, January 25 at 6:00pm EST . I will be drawing a winner with a random number generator.

Thanks, bloggy friends, for your kind and encouraging words over the years, for your creative inspiration, and for your friendship!

in case you didn’t know, I knit

I’m wearing a handknit sweater, a handspun handknit scarf, a pair of handspun handknit mitts, and, usually, a handspun handknit hat. But in case you didn’t know I knit, I’ve also added a bag that says, “knit.”

I can’t tell you how much I seriously love this bag. Jen sent it to me as a gift, since it’s basically perfect for getting around on crutches with. Up until I got it, I’d been using a backpack, which works okay. But the problem with a backpack is that you have to stop and take it off to get anything out of it (obviously you don’t have to do that if you are only wearing it with one strap, but I can’t really do that on crutches any more than I can wear a regular purse or tote bag – it bangs into the crutch). So a messenger-style bag is perfect. I can wear it on the front of my body for easy access, but it doesn’t get in the way of the crutches at all. And the size is perfect! As a knitting bag, yes, but also for using as a regular tote, which is how I’ve been using it. And it doesn’t scream “college student” the way my backpack was doing. And this color is so perfect for my wardrobe. Love it.

This is a new offering in Jen’s shop , and in honor of the first anniversary of her shop, she is giving one of these away (and with yarn!). If you haven’t already, take a minute to go over and leave her a blog comment.

Thank you so much, Jen! I LOVE it.

(p.s. I’m pictured here with only one crutch because I’m making progress, y’all!)